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COCA Trial Result Presentation Livestream

Tuesday, November 30th

Both the PARAMEDIC2 trial and the VAM-IHCA trial reported improved rates of return of spontaneous circulation with adrenaline, and the combination of vasopressin plus methylprednisolone (along with adrenaline). However, neither intervention resulted in improved survival with good neurological outcomes.

Will calcium be the drug intervention that makes a difference in acute resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?

With a panel containing expert clinicians, cardiac resuscitation trialists, and a trials statistician, the COCA trial results will extensively discussed and its implications for clinical practice explored. Don't miss it!

The countdown has begun

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Selected Global Timings

São Paulo

16:30 to 18:10

New York

14:30 to 16:10

San Francisco

11:30 to 13:10

Christchurch (1st)

08:30 to 10:10

Sydney (1st)

06:30 to 08:10

Hong Kong (1st)

03:30 to 05:10

Kathmandu (1st)

01:15 to 02:55

Nairobi

22:30 to 00:10

Copenhagen

20:30 to 22:10

Schedule

19:30
Background & Methods

Mikael Fink Vallentin

19:45
Results

Lars Wiuff Andersen

20:00
Editorial

Gavin Perkins

20:15
Reply to the Editorial

Lars Wiuff Andersen

Mikael Fink Vallentin

20:20
Viewer's Questions

Chris Nutt

20:30
Panel Discussion

Theresa Olasveengen

Victoria Cornelius

Christopher Seymour

01:40
End

Speakers

Lars Wiuff Andersen

Associate Professor, Aarhus University, Denmark

Lars W. Andersen is a clinician and researcher interested in patients with acute and critical illness and with a special focus on patients with cardiac arrest. His research spans animal experiments, observational studies, clinical trials, and systematic reviews. He is currently the principal investigator on multiple clinical trials, including in patients with cardiac arrest in- or out-of-hospital. He is a member of the Advanced Life Support task force at the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. He is a statistical reviewer at JAMA and an editorial board member at Resuscitation.

Twitter:  @LarsWAndersen1

Mikael Fink Vallentin

PhD Candidate, Aarhus University, Denmark

Mikael Fink Vallentin is a medical doctor and researcher working at the Prehospital Emergency Medical Services in the Central Denmark Region. He has clinical experience in anaesthesia and is currently working full time as a Ph.D.-student. He has primarily focused on clinical trials in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest where the second trial is currently underway.

Gavin Perkins

Professor of Critical Care Medicine at the University of Warwick, England

Gavin Perkins is Professor of Critical Care Medicine at the University of Warwick. He leads the emergency and critical care group within Warwick Clinical Trials Unit. He served as Chief Investigator for the BALTI, BALTI-prevention and PARAMEDIC-1 (LUCAS) trial and is currently Chief Investigator for the PARAMEDIC-2 (Adrenaline) and Breathe Trials. Clinically he holds appointments as a Consultant Physician in Critical Care Medicine at Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust and MERIT Team Consultant with West Midlands Ambulance Service. Prof Perkins is a Director of Research for the Intensive Care Foundation and Clinical Speciality Lead for Critical Care (West Midlands CRN), Division 6 Clinical Research Lead (West Midlands CRN). He has been a member (2000-10) and then chairman (2010-present) of the ALS Sub-committee during which time he developed, evaluated and implemented the e-ALS course. He has served as ILCOR and ERC Co-chair for BLS/AED since 2010. In these roles he has developed collaborative networks with international partners and co-ordinated the revision to the 2015 Utstein cardiac arrest template. He was elected as ILCOR Co-chair in 2015.

Twitter:  @perkins_gd

Theresa Olasveengen

Professor of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway

Dr Olasveengen is a professor and intensivist at University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital with a broad interest in cardiac arrest research; from qualitative studies in emergency medical dispatch to clinical studies, randomized trials and basic animal research. Current research is concentrated on how to protect the brain in the immediate post-arrest phase. She is also chair of the International Liaison Committee On Resuscitation (ILCOR) Basic Life Support task force, and co-chair of the European Resuscitation Councils Basic Life Support Science and Education Committee, working to evaluate our current knowledge base in resuscitation science and translate this knowledge into guidelines and education.

Twitter:  @olasveengen

Victoria Cornelius

Reader in Medical Statistics, Imperial College, London

Victoria Cornelius is Reader in Medical Statistics at Imperial College London, and Head of Statistics and Trial Methodology at Imperial Clinical Trials Unit. She leads the Child Health trial portfolio and is an Academic Lead for the Research Design Service (RDS) London. Victoria is passionate about translating best statistical practice into applied research. She has collaborated and led national research projects in laboratory studies, feasibility trials, and early phase clinical trials research to support methods translation. Victoria is a member of the NIHR Academy Doctoral fellowship board and Joint Global Health Trials funding Committee.

Twitter:  @VR_Cornelius

Christopher Seymour

Associate Professor, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Dr. Seymour is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, and Clinical and Translational Science at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Over the past 10 years, his research program has focused on clinical and translational studies involving sepsis, biomarkers, and large electronic health record databases. Dr. Seymour completed his NIGMS Career Development Award (K23), mentored by Dr. Derek Angus, titled “Prehospital identification of high-risk sepsis.” This successful award led to funding of a NIH/NIGMS R35 ESI-Merit Investigator Research Award, “Sepsis endotypes during emergency care.” He is Director of the Clinical and Translational Science Program in the Department of Critical Care Medicine, member of the International Sepsis Forum (ISF), and Associate Editor for Critical Care at JAMA. His research has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, and The Lancet, among others.

Twitter:  @seymoc

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